Friday, July 06, 2012

The Bastardy Epidemic Revisited

Sexual morality is not [solely or even mostly] an individual issue. The individual when continuously confronted with temptation will [probably] eventually fall. It only takes one mistake to conceive a baby...

Most individuals--including Christians--aren't very virtuous. Virtue requires long periods of sustained moral effort to be developed...

There are many social causes for the epidemic of single parenthood (little to no enforcement of moral behavior, inheritance/ legitimacy laws, easy divorce, women's "rights", etc.). Other causes exist for why Christians don't practice behaviors discouraging single parenthood (compassion for people who make mistakes [they're sinners--aren't we all?], compassion for the faultless children, etc).

The hard pill to swallow is that in order for a moral society to be maintained, severe sanctions must be brought to bear against those who practice sexual immorality. Those who cannot control their urges must be severely corrected and eventually ostracized if they persist in their destructive behaviors...

Private church discipline (e.g., the RCC confessional/ penance system) and public shaming would have to be part of the solution.

However, we as a culture aren't willing to go there because we're the nicest civilization in history.

2 comments:

August said...

The Roman Catholic practice has devolved badly. The bastards, and perhaps most importantly, their mothers have far more of a 'place' in the Church than I do. Meanwhile, confession has become bureaucratic in nature rather than therapeutic. You go in and tick off the checklist; there is no pretense of having a confessor, though occasionally you run into some priest who imagines himself a therapist in the modern sense of the term- secular, unhelpful, and probably of demonic origin.
The Eastern Orthodox churches may have kept the tradition of confession better- their bishops have the option of ordaining married men, so there can be enough priests for them to be actual confessors.

A. M. said...

Very disturbing, August, I don't doubt what you say. As I have limited experience with the confessional, I can only provide an initial early impression: the prescribed penances seem to be very light. Perhaps it's to the purpose of allowing conscience to have a role. If so, it's up to the penitent to seek out a helpful confessor and work towards making ammends when opportunity presents itself.